A Radical Approach to Risk Management

The world of cybersecurity has changed. Cybercriminals today target organizations and unleash a torrent of malicious files and attacks that flood an enterprise until a breach occurs. They have learned to automate the production of malicious code and vary it just enough to create never-before-seen or unknown attacks.

Many businesses, whether small, midsized, or large, have been infiltrated without detection. Today’s risk management leaders need agile defenses that quickly adapt to these new demands and stay ahead of attacks.

Yet, threats are only part of the story. The everchanging technology landscape adds complexity for the CISO, CIO, and IT leader.

The future of information risk requires radical change to face the modern landscape. It means gaining a level of understanding and a new model for assessing conditions and moving forward.

Many companies detect and respond to cyberattacks, but cannot prevent them. For decades, the antivirus industry was built on the concept of detection and response — and all technology, solutions, and services operated under this paradigm.

In addition, previous attempts to prevent threats failed. By employing traditional security, organizations expose themselves to high risks and long-term costs, since they react to attacks that infected at least one employee, known as the proverbial ‘sacrificial lamb.

Detecting incidents after they have successfully breached the network both strengthens attacker’s chances of success and weakens target companies against cyber vulnerabilities.

So how do you transcend a failed tactical approach when it’s the singular paradigm in place within the global expanse of an entire industry? The first step requires looking at how cybersecurity success is defined by examining security controls.

Specifically, executives and IT staff should understand whether a control architecture improves or impedes business agility and velocity.

This paper explains the 9 Box of Controls approach IT controls, including control types and automation approaches, the overall control architecture, and the significance of control friction on business productivity.

Download the complete whitepaper HERE.